We make learning fun with program activities

We make learning fun with program activities

7th January 2019OffByRiseNews

ABCya is the leader in free educational computer games and mobile apps for kids. The innovation of a grade school teacher, ABCya is an award-we make learning fun with program activities destination for elementary students that offers hundreds of fun, engaging learning activities. Millions of kids, parents, and teachers visit ABCya. Apple, The New York Times, USA Today, Parents Magazine and Scholastic, to name just a few, have featured ABCya’s popular educational games.

ABCya’s award-winning Preschool computer games and apps are conceived and realized under the direction of a certified technology education teacher, and have been trusted by parents and teachers for ten years. Our educational games are easy to use and classroom friendly, with a focus on the alphabet, numbers, shapes, storybooks, art, music, holidays and much more! ABCya’s award-winning Kindergarten computer games and apps are conceived and realized under the direction of a certified technology education teacher, and have been trusted by parents and teachers for ten years. Our educational games are easy to use and classroom friendly, with a focus on the alphabet, numbers, shapes, storybooks, keyboarding, money, patterns, art, matching, holidays and much more! ABCya’s award-winning First Grade computer games and apps are conceived and realized under the direction of a certified technology education teacher, and have been trusted by parents and teachers for ten years. Our educational games are easy to use and classroom friendly, with a focus on the sight words, spelling, storybooks, addition and subtraction, place value, money, art, music, holidays and much more! ABCya’s award-winning Second Grade computer games and apps are conceived and realized under the direction of a certified technology education teacher, and have been trusted by parents and teachers for ten years.

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Our educational games are easy to use and classroom friendly, with a focus on the sight words, parts of speech, storybooks, addition and subtraction, keyboarding, graphing, rounding, place value, money, art, holidays and much more! ABCya’s award-winning Third Grade computer games and apps are conceived and realized under the direction of a certified technology education teacher, and have been trusted by parents and teachers for ten years. Our educational games are easy to use and classroom friendly, with a focus on the parts of speech, grammar, Spanish, fractions, multiplication and division, typing, geography, science, strategy, puzzles and much more! ABCya’s award-winning Fourth Grade computer games and apps are conceived and realized under the direction of a certified technology education teacher, and have been trusted by parents and teachers for ten years. Our educational games are easy to use and classroom friendly, with a focus on the parts of speech, grammar, Spanish, fractions, percents, decimals, time, measuring, word searches, crossword puzzles, holiday activities and much more! ABCya’s award-winning Fifth Grade computer games and apps are conceived and realized under the direction of a certified technology education teacher, and have been trusted by parents and teachers for ten years. Our educational games are easy to use and classroom friendly, with a focus on mathematical operations, estimation, measuring, art and creativity, maps, animation, word clouds, physics, typing games and much more!

The Leader in Educational Games for Kids! English program for children between the ages of 4 to 12 featuring tons of cartoon animated videos, games, tests and worksheets to teach and review vocabulary, grammar, spelling and communicative skills. Games for ESL Classroom Teaching Jeopardy Quiz Show, Billionaire, Show down and more. I cannot tell you just how excited I am to offer this new section. Game Templates For teachers, these printable and powerpoint games will form the bases of most of your lessons. Easy to play, Easy to customize and create yours.

Powerpoint Games for practising English vocabulary, grammar and many language skills. Create Games for your teaching using our templates. Very easy with the several video tutorials. In this category, you will find games that practice: Grammar, Vocabulary, Reading, Spelling, Pronunciation and Listening skills.

Board games and more games you can print and take to class can be found here. Also you will find templates for building yours. Easy categorization of the games by levels of students. Designed to help you bring fun to the class, our PPT games are excellent classroom games for classes with white boards and computers.

ESL Games World is the ultimate English learning fun lab with lots of interactive exercises for teachers and students of English. This site is brought to you free of charge by the same team that brought you the ESL-galaxy. We have no doubt that you will find this website a handy tool for your teaching and learning of English. Some of the games include: Wheel of Fortune, Snakes and Ladders, Hangman, Memory Games, Spelling Games, Slot Machine, Word Classification Exercises and a host of others. If you are the type of person who prefers to have games on powerpoint or as printable handouts, we have been thinking of you. We offer board games, powerpoint games and more for the classroom and one to one teaching.

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They have made my lessons fun and I have no doubt yours will be fun too. It is total fun and highly engaging fun lessons with these resources. Games have the power or eliminating negative emotions and keeping learning total fun. With the absence of the affective filter, learning is much more effective. We offer a variety of printable ESL board games and card games to help give your students lots of communicative practice.

These games are in printable ESL PDF and MS Word formats. All of these games have been used in ESL classrooms and trust me when I say they work great. On ESL Games World we do not only aim at providing you with games for your classrooms. We have taken a step further to offer you free ESL games templates to empower you with the tools to make your own exercises.

Create Powerpoint and Printable Games in minutes. We understand that you may not have too much time for planning a lesson. This is why we offer you our most precious game templates for free. Create your own exercises using our highly intuitive game templates. This is designed to be the most interactive site for ESL classroom and self-study of English. These activities have been developed by national reading experts for you to use with children, ages birth to Grade 6. In using these activities, your main goal will be to develop great enthusiasm in the reader for reading and writing.

It is less important for the reader to get every word exactly right. It is more important for the child to learn to love reading itself. If the reader finishes one book and asks for another, you know you are succeeding! If your reader writes even once a week and comes back for more, you know you have accomplished your beginning goals. We wish you many wonderful hours of reading and writing with children!

Activities for birth to preschool: The early years Activity 1: Books and babies Babies love to listen to the human voice. What better way than through reading! When your baby is about six months old, choose books with brightly colored, simple pictures and lots of rhythm in the text. Include books that show pictures and names of familiar objects.

As you read with your baby, point out objects in the pictures and make sure your baby sees all the things that are fun to do with books. Pat the Bunny by Dorothy Kunhardt is a classic touch-and-feel book for babies. Vary the tone of your voice with different characters in the stories, sing nursery rhymes, make funny faces, do whatever special effects you can to stimulate your baby’s interest. Allow your child to touch and hold cloth and sturdy cardboard books. When reading to a baby, keep the sessions brief but read daily and often. Allowing babies to handle books deepens their attachment even more. Activity 2: Tot talk What’s “old hat” to you can be new and exciting to toddlers and preschoolers.

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When you talk about everyday experiences, you help children connect their world to language and enable them to go beyond that world to new ideas. When your 2- or 3-year-old “helps” by taking out all the pots and pans, talk about them. Can you find a lid for that one? When walking down the street and your toddler or preschooler stops to collect leaves, stop and ask questions that require more than a “yes” or “no” answer. What would happen if we didn’t shovel the snow? What if that butterfly lands on your nose? Answer your child’s endless “why” questions patiently.

When you say, “I don’t know, let’s look it up,” you show how important books are as resources for answering questions. After your child tells you a story, ask questions so you can understand better. That way children learn how to tell complete stories and know you are interested in what they have to say. Surround these events with lots of comments, questions, and answers. Talking enables children to expand their vocabulary and understanding of the world. The ability to carry on a conversation is important for reading development.

Remember, it is better to talk too much rather than too little with a small child. Repetition makes books predictable, and young readers love knowing what comes next. Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? Horton Hatches the Egg by Dr. The Little Engine That Could by Watty Piper. Little pig, little pig, let me come in.

Not by the hair on my chinny-chin-chin. Then I’ll huff and I’ll puff and I’ll blow your house in! After the wolf has blown down the first pig’s house, your child will soon join in with the refrain. Read slowly, and with a smile or a nod, let your child know you appreciate his or her participation.

As the child grows more familiar with the story, pause and give him or her a chance to fill in the blanks and phrases. Encourage your child to pretend to read, especially books that contain repetition and rhyme. Most children who enjoy reading will eventually memorize all or parts of a book and imitate your reading. This is a normal part of reading development. When children anticipate what’s coming next in a story or poem, they have a sense of mastery over books.

When children feel power, they have the courage to try. Pretending to read is an important step in the process of learning to read. Activity 4: Poetry in motion When children “act out” a good poem, they learn to love its rhyme, rhythm, and the pictures it paints with a few well-chosen words. They grow as readers by connecting feelings with the written word. In other words, “ham it up. If there is a poem your child is particularly fond of, suggest acting out a favorite line. Be sure to award such efforts with delighted enthusiasm.

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Suggest acting out a verse, a stanza, or the entire poem. Ask your child to make a face the way the character in the poem is feeling. Remember that facial expressions bring emotion into the performer’s voice. Be an enthusiastic audience for your child. If your child is comfortable with the idea, look for a larger setting with an attentive, appreciative audience. Perhaps an after-dinner “recital” for family members would appeal to your child.

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Mistakes are a fact of life, so ignore them. Poems are often short with lots of white space on the page. This makes them manageable for new readers and helps to build their confidence. Activity 5: Story talk Talking about what you read is another way to help children develop language and thinking skills.

You won’t need to plan the talk, discuss every story, or expect an answer. You can say: “I wonder what’s going to happen next! Or ask a question: “Do you know what a palace is? Or point out: “Look where the little mouse is now. Answer your children’s questions, and if you think they don’t understand something, stop and ask them.

Don’t worry if you break into the flow of a story to make something clear. But keep the story flowing as smooth as possible. Talking about stories they read helps children develop their vocabularies, link stories to everyday life, and use what they know about the world to make sense out of stories. Activity 6: Now hear this Children are great mimics. When you tell stories, your child will begin to tell stories, too. Listen closely when your child speaks. If you don’t understand some part of the story, take the time to get your child to explain.

This will help your child understand the relationship between a speaker and a listener and an author and a reader. Encourage your child to express himself or herself. This will help your child develop a richer vocabulary. It can also help with pronouncing words clearly.

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Having a good audience is very helpful for a child to improve language skills, as well as confidence in speaking. Parents can be the best audience a child will ever have. Activity 7: TV Television can be a great tool for education. The keys to successful TV viewing are setting limits, making good choices, taking time to watch together, discussing what you view, and encouraging follow-up reading. Involve your child in choosing which programs to watch. Read the TV schedule together to choose.

Monitor what your child is watching, and whenever possible, watch the programs with your child. When you watch programs with your child, discuss what you have seen so your child can better understand the programs. Many experts recommend that children watch no more than 10 hours of TV each week. Limiting TV viewing frees up time for reading and writing activities. It is worth noting that captioned TV shows can be especially helpful for children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, studying English as a second language, or having difficulty learning to read.

Check out Reading Rockets’ new summer website, Start with a Book. Activity 8: World of words Here are a few ways to create a home rich in words. Print the letters in large type. Capital letters are usually easier for young children to learn first. Label the things in your child’s pictures.

If your child draws a picture of a house, label it with “This is a house. Have your child watch you write when you make a shopping list or a “what to do” list. Say the words aloud and carefully print each letter. Let your child make lists, too.

Help your child form the letters and spell the words. Look at newspapers and magazines with your child. Find an interesting picture and show it to your child as you read the caption aloud. Cut out pictures of people and places and label them. By exposing your child to words and letters often, your child will begin to recognize the shapes of letters. The world of words will become friendly.

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Activity 9: Write on Writing helps a child become a better reader, and reading helps a child become a better writer. It could include descriptions of your outings and activities, along with mementos such as fall leaves and flowers, birthday cards, and photographs. Older children can do these activities on their own. Use a chalkboard or a family message board as an exciting way to involve children in writing with a purpose. Keep supplies of paper, pencils, markers, and the like within easy reach. Encourage beginning and developing writers to keep journals and write stories.

We make learning fun with program activities

We make learning fun with program activities

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Ask questions that will help children organize the stories, and respond to their questions about letters and spelling. Suggest they share the activity with a smaller brother, sister, or friend. Respond to the content of children’s writing, and don’t be overly concerned with misspellings. Over time you can help your child concentrate on learning to spell correctly. When children begin to write, they run the risk of criticism, and it takes courage to continue. Our job as parents is to help children find the courage.

We make learning fun with program activities

We can do it by expressing our appreciation of their efforts. Activity 10: Look for books The main thing is to find books you both love. They will shape your child’s first impression of the world of reading. Visit your local public library, and as early as possible, get your child a library card. Ask the librarian for help in selecting books. Have your child join you in browsing for books and making selections. Each year the American Library Association selects children’s books for the Caldecott Medal for illustrations and the Newbery Medal for writing.

Check the book review section of the newspapers and magazines for the recommended new children’s books. If you and your child don’t enjoy reading a particular book, put it aside and pick up another one. Keep in mind that your child’s reading level and listening level are different. When you read easy books, beginning readers will soon be reading along with you. When you read more advanced books, you instill a love of stories, and you build the motivation that transforms children into lifelong readers. Activity 11: Read to me It’s important to read to your child, but equally important to listen to them read to you.

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Children thrive on having someone appreciate their developing skills. You read a paragraph and have your child read the next one or you read half the page and your child reads the other half. As your child becomes more at ease with reading aloud, take turns reading a full page. Keep in mind that your child may be focusing more on how to read the words than what they mean, and your reading helps to keep the story alive. Guide the child to use what he or she knows about letter sounds.